How old should my pet be when he or she is spayed/neutered?

Most clinics require animals to reach “two months, two pounds” before they consider them strong enough for surgery. From this point to six months of age, vets refer to the surgery as pediatric, or early-age spay/neuter. Because babies are more fragile, veterinarians receive extra training in order to perform pediatric spay/neuter surgeries. Dr. Brendan Bergquist and Dr. Robbie Wrighten are licensed and qualified to perform spay and neuter surgeries for puppies and kittens under six months old.

What about my senior pet’s surgery?

Even when animals are older, the benefits of spaying and neutering almost always outweigh the risks of surgery. Vets should give pets more than five years old pre-surgical blood tests, to show how well their major organs are functioning. That will help keep them safe through anesthesia. Ask your veterinarian about blood work for your senior pet before scheduling your senior pets spay/neuter appointment.

When should I take away food and water before surgery?

It’s important to stop feeding your pet by midnight the night before surgery. You can offer water overnight but remove it in the morning. This will help to reduce the risk of vomiting under anesthesia.